BWPA announces 19 flying scholarships

The British Women Pilots’ Association (BWPA) has announced the winners of its 2021 aviation scholarships.

They are:

  • Amy Dewhurst
  • Yasmina El Sayed
  • Rachel Harvey
  • Alison Field
  • Olivia Brown
  • Katie Stokes
  • Lizzy Mukori
  • Holly Harris
  • Hannah McCann
  • Tabitha Shaw
  • Sue Sheikh
  • Rachel Calvert
  • Grace McKellar
  • Charlotte Hill
  • Jayne Stubbs
  • Rebekah Yore
  • Gemma Jefferies
  • Daisy Bing
  • Fiona Smith.

The scholarships were provided by the BWPA, SkyDemon, Helicentre Aviation, Flight Deck Wingman, Easy PPL, Bristol Groundschool, CATS Aviation and 624squadron.com.

The BWPA offers scholarships every year to support women in the UK in achieving their flying dreams, underlying its key aim to promote their training and employment within the sector.

Holly Harris BWPA
Holly Harris is one ofn the scholarship winners. Top: So is Rachel Harvey. Read more about the winners’ stories on the link below. Photos: BWPA

BWPA Chairwoman Sharon Nicholson said, “Only 5-6% of professional pilots in the UK and worldwide are women and the percentages in general aviation are similar. Much of this is due to lack of information and opportunity.

“For the second year in a row, the BWPA has seen a large increase in the number of applications for scholarships.

“The winners are all extremely impressive individuals who are already giving a great deal to aviation, including encouraging other women to consider flying as a hobby or career.

“We hope these scholarships will support them in achieving their ambitions and continuing to inspire others.

Amy Dewhurst BWPA
Another winner – Amy Dewhurst

Amy Dewhurst, winner of a BWPA Flying Start Scholarship, says, “After many setbacks, including the COVID-19 pandemic and the British weather, this scholarship is an amazing award. It will really spur me on to succeed in making a career in aviation.”

BWPA

Comments

  1. According to BWPA Chairwoman Sharon Nicholson: “Only 5-6% of professional pilots in the UK and worldwide are women and the percentages in general aviation are similar. Much of this is due to lack of information and opportunity.”
    Surely “information” and “opportunity” are no less available to women than to men.
    The main barrier to aviation is financial, and more to do with class than sex.

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